Carnegie Mellon develops ground-breaking technique to fast track bio-printing human organs.

3D bio-printing organs has become a more popular topic in the last few years with news such as BioLife4D bio-printing a mini-heart or the announcement of the creation of small vascular networks. With these advancements and many more appearing from the pipeline, the global 3D bioprinting market size is projected to reach $792 million by 2022 showing a rising interest in the field…

However, researchers at the Carnegie Mellon University have developed a new technique that may eliminate the hurdle of stability. The new technique was called FRESH (freeform reversible embedding of suspended hydrogels). The aim of this technique was to help 3D bio-print heart components and eventually a full heart. Studies with the new technique printed cardiac ventricles and found they were able to contract like a real heart and even expanded its walls by 14% when contracting in the same way that a real heart would…

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